Performance of Yumi Janairo Roth’s Spin (after Sol LeWitt)

sign spinner spinning red sign
(Photo credit: Bobby Rogers. Spinner Ray Rivera)
Yumi Janairo Roth
Spin (after Sol LeWitt)
ongoing artist-in-residence
Performance, Workshops, and Site-Specific Spinning
Saturday, April 6 from 6-9pm
Working with a group of professional sign spinners from AArrow Sign Spinners of Orange County and LA, artist Yumi Janairo Roth’s projectSpin (after Sol LeWitt) is at once a collaborative experiential project, public performance, and site-based installation that activates and recontextualizes Sol LeWitt’s foundational text, “Sentences on Conceptual Art.” During the Downtown Santa Ana Art Walk, sign spinners will perform on intersections throughout downtown Santa Ana, workshop with public at Grand Central Art Center, and converge on the 2nd Street Promenade where they will perform collectively.
ABOUT THE ARTIST:
Yumi Janairo Roth is currently a Grand Central Art Center artist-in- residence working in research and development of a new project.  The artist was born in Eugene, OR and raised in Chicago and suburban Washington DC. She currently lives and works in Boulder, Colorado where she is a professor or sculpture at the University of Colorado. Roth has created a diverse body of work that explores ideas of immigration, hybridity, and displacement through discrete objects and site-responsive installations, solo project as well as collaborations. In her projects, her objects function as both natives and interlopers to their environments, simultaneously recognizable and unfamiliar to their users. She received a BA in anthropology from Tufts University, a BFA from the School of the Museum of Fine Arts-Boston and an MFA from the State University of New York-New Paltz.

Roth has exhibited and participated in artist-in-residencies nationally and internationally, including New York (Bronx River Art Center, Sara Meltzer Gallery, Momenta Art, Lower Manhattan Cultural Council, Smack Mellon, Cuchifritos), San Francisco (Limn Gallery), Portland (Institute of Contemporary Art, Map Room) Houston (Lawndale Art Center, Diverse Works), Boston (New Art Center), Denver (Rule Gallery, Center for Visual Arts, Museum of Contemporary Art), Minneapolis (Soap Factory), Milwaukee (Institute of Visual Arts, Kohler Arts/Industry), Santa Fe (Museum of Fine Arts), Seattle (Consolidated Works), Mexico (Arcaute Arte Contemporaneo, La Galleria Rufino Tamayo), the Philippines (Ayala and Vargas Museums), Colombia (Universidad Nacional de Colombia) Czech Republic (Galerie Klatovy-Klenova, Institute of Art and Design-Pilsen), and Germany (Frankfurter Kunstverein).

Penn Jillette on David Greenberger’s GCAC Project!

 

    ^  *If the sound does not play automatically, click just to the left of the 00:00 mark, just above the arrow and it should begin.

Penn Jillette (Yes, from Penn and Teller fame) says some beautiful things about the It Happened To Me album, David Greenberger‘s Grand Central Art Center artist-in-residence project, on his Penn’s Sunday School podcast this week in the final quarter of the program (but the whole show is great and includes his daughter Moxie too).   The entire episode can be streamed or downloaded here (episode #475, “Zen Dentistry”): https://pennsundayschool.com/episodes/

A vinyl record and a CD cover over a white background.

Jon Haddock: The Things (that do not spark joy)

Jon Haddock artwork
Jon Haddock
The Things (that do not spark joy)
March 2 through September 15, 2019

Opening Reception: Saturday, March from 7-10pm  

Artist Jon Haddock explores lines between fiction, media, and reality. Drawing inspiration from both popular culture and high art, he often references the language of comic books and video games to question the use, influence, and role of the image in today’s society.

The Things (that do not spark joy), a mural by the artist, depicts Santa Ana-born actor Robert Webber (1924 – 1989) in his role as Ikar in the television show The Outer Limits episode Keeper of the Purple Twilight from 1964. In the episode, an unearthly being approaches a driven scientist with offers to exchange his alien intelligence in return for the experience of human emotions. Their experiment, however, has unforeseen consequences for both, as soon a team of alien enforcers arrives to destroy them, along with the scientist’s girlfriend, Janet.

In what appears to be a time of societal decluttering, Haddock considers the role of intelligence and emotion in our strategies as a culture for keeping, or not keeping, parts of our abusive history. As many begin to follow advice from individuals such as Marie Kondo to “only keep items that spark joy,” the artist questions if there is any wiggle room for retaining potentially toxic objects, ones that connect to an individuals or societies history? If so, what extra care, defensive protection, and awareness of the object’s lethality must be employed? Are these steps worth it and how do we decide, with our hearts or with our minds?

ABOUT THE ARTIST:

Jon Haddock lives, works and teaches in Phoenix, Arizona. His work has been exhibited internationally, in venues that include the Yerba Buena Art Center in San Francisco, ZKM Karlsrue, PaceWildenstein in New York, Witte Zaal in Ghent, Arizona State University Art Museum in Tempe, and The Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. Mr. Haddock’s work is in the collections of several institutions, including the Whitney Museum in New York and the Henry Gallery in Seattle.

Generous support for the Grand Central Art Center artist-in-residence program has been provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

Jennifer Nelson: Habeas Corpus – Participatory Research Action – Phase 1

Image with black text on grey background

Jennifer Nelson
Habeas Corpus
Participatory Research Action – Phase 1

Interaction: Saturday, March 2 from 7-10pm

Investigation #1: Legal imagination…fictions and experiences

Standing between a State’s power to imprison you and your right to liberty is the Writ of Habeas Corpus-meaning have the body, in court. This basic legal premise can recalibrate the dance between an individual and the massive physical and social power we have given to the government. The procedures of the law can be impersonal and arcane, inflexible for the uninitiated, but perhaps elastic for the highest paid counsel. How judges interpret law must be constructed, and constructed anew, through stories of precedent, yet able to be altered by presiding public opinion. The law that guards or strips your liberty is made from nothing more than memories and stories…and yet it is capable of graphically marking, or saving, the lives of those it touches directly.

Artist Jennifer Nelson is looking for your experience, projections, fears, and fictions about how the law works for a person detained. Our many stories together will make a collective, legal imagination. What story do you tell?

Generous support for the Grand Central Art Center artist-in-residence program has been provided by The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts.

ABOUT THE ARTIST:

Informed by lived world events, with a dancer’s perspective, Jennifer Nelson’s cross-disciplinary work probes the potential of social and ecological choreography. Her works consider inter-system relationships as a holistic, collective, sculptural practice. She is committed to the playful realignment of social spaces through a collective initiative, and to the transformative possibilities of the individual act. Her deep-rooted interest in co-creation, and its political, aesthetic and social possibilities, extends throughout her practice as artist and teacher.

Among many influences, her work has been significantly shaped by her direct personal experience with disruptive or transitional world choreographies like the 1989 San Francisco earthquake, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the media aftermath of September 11th, and currently, the on-going economic hardship in Athens, Greece. Having lived and worked in multiple countries, she has a lived understanding of fragile resources, natural and human, and the global sculptural flow of power and matter. These global flows must be linked and translated to a bodily scale for ethical action to begin.

Nelson danced with the Feld Ballet in New York and the Ballet du Grand Théatre in Geneva, Switzerland, and studied New Genres at the San Francisco Art Institute and at the University of California, Los Angeles, where she received her MFA.  She has exhibited in museums and festivals in the Americas, Europe, and Asia. Recent projects have been on the streets of Athens and in Nestor, 1st Psychogeriatric Boarding House with the Guerrilla Optimists. She has also worked in collaboration with men from the Second Chance School in Korydallos prison with the National Museum of Contemporary Art, Athens. She has collaborated with trauma and music therapists, victims of violence, immigrant groups, chemists, grandmothers, and musicians. Her 2019 video embroidery, Democracy is a Party, opening this month in Athens, turns the 2015 “No” referendum speech by Greek prime minister Alexis Tsipras into an exorcism/exposure therapy, musical meditation on life in Greece under austerity.

Nelson teaches time-based art and political theatre at the American College of Greece, where she helped found the Visual Arts program in 2007.

20th Anniversary Celebration – March 2nd

Grand Central Art Center 20th anniversary logo

 

GIVEAWAYS, INTERACTIVE PERFORMANCE, OPENING RECEPTION, CAKE + MORE

 

GRAND CENTRAL ART CENTER CELEBRATES

20TH ANNIVERSARY

SATURDAY, MARCH 2ND from 7-10PM

 

OPENING RECEPTIONS

Lost Islands of Philadelphia

Jennifer Levonian

To the artist Jennifer Levonian’s surprise, she recently learned there were once two lively islands in the Delaware River right beside Philadelphia. Smith and Windmill Islands were best known for their amusement park and baths, accessible via a quick ferry ride. To make way for shipping traffic, the federal government removed the islands in 1894. Only one year later, a columnist for the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin was already wondering how long before the islands would become a vague memory. “It is curious,” the columnist wrote, “how soon our memories lose their hold on places.” The artist thought it was poignant that two islands could be removed and completely forgotten.

Levonian’s cutout animation Lost Islands of Philadelphia tells the story of the islands, touching on themes of obsolescence and transience. It follows a girl who, after reading about the islands in a library book, but is unaware of their destruction, sets off on her own to find them. Her mother pursues her frantically on rollerblades, her lack of skating skills causing mayhem all the way.

Jennifer Levonian makes animations near Philadelphia. Her work has been exhibited across the United States, including at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Telfair Museum in Savannah, GA, the Contemporary Museum in Baltimore and the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C. In 2009, she was awarded a Pew Fellowship in the Arts. She has attended residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Atlantic Center for the Arts. Her animation Xylophone won the Ken Burns Best of the Fest award at the 2017 Ann Arbor Film Festival.

 

PROJECT MURAL WALL

Jon Haddock

Through an artist-in-residence, artist Jon Haddock will be creating a new mural on the GCAC Project Wall.

Jon Haddock lives, works and teaches in Phoenix, Arizona. His work has been exhibited internationally, in venues that include the Yerba Buena Art Center in San Francisco, ZKM Karlsrue, PaceWildenstein in New York, Witte Zaal in Ghent, Arizona State University Art Museum in Tempe, and The Whitney Museum of American Art in New York. Mr. Haddock’s work is in the collections of several institutions, including the Whitney Museum in New York, and the Henry Gallery in Seattle.

 

INTERACTIVE PERFORMANCE

Lucas Murgida: None of This is Real – Phase 4

7-10pm

Through an interactive performance that will premiere the evening of March 2nd, GCAC artist-in-residence Lucas Murgida will segment GCAC’s storefront gallery by creating an impasse that spans from the street facing the window and extends to a rear wall. Participants, with engaged instructional guidance from the artist, will work in teams of two to circumvent the impasse, utilizing high-speed grinders and saws to create a portal into the gallery interior. The participants will then be instructed in methods to repair the damage they have caused, allowing the next group of participants to experience the similar installation and engagement. The experience will be free and open to people of all ages and abilities.

 

GIVEAWAYS

David Greenberger CDs

Every Hour

The first 20 guests entering Grand Central Art Center at the top of each hour will receive a free CD of GCAC artist-in-residence David Greenberger’s latest project It Happened to Me. The CD includes 60-original song recorded with Greenberger’s trio Prime Len, based on actual conversations with senior citizens of the Santa Ana community. Cover design artwork for the CD was created by artist Ed Ruscha.

 

CAKE WILL BE SERVED

Throughout the Evening

GCAC will be producing 20 special cakes that will commemorate projects realized by artists with the center. Cake will be served throughout the evening to guests.

 

CONTINUING EXHIBITIONS

7-10PM

A Slow Conflict

Yevgeniya Mikhailik

 

Layers of the City

Angel Nevarez & Valerie Tevere

Manny Escamilla | From the edge to the center: A short history of Grand Central

From the edge to the center: A short history of Grand Central

with Manny Escamilla

Friday, February 22, 5:00 PM

Local historian Manny Escamilla will cover how the history of the Grand Central building reflects the history of changes within downtown Santa Ana.

Event is FREE and open to the public. Free refreshments and parking validation for all attendees.

For more information email: grandcentral@fullerton.edu

 

 

Jennifer Levonian: Lost Islands of Philadelphia

illustration of individuals inside a public bus

Jennifer Levonian
Lost Islands of Philadelphia
March 2 – May 19, 2019

Opening Reception: Saturday, March 2 from 7-10pm

To the artist Jennifer Levonian’s surprise, she recently learned there were once two lively islands in the Delaware River right beside Philadelphia. Smith and Windmill Islands were best known for their amusement park and baths, accessible via a quick ferry ride. To make way for shipping traffic, the federal government removed the islands in 1894. Only one year later, a columnist for the Philadelphia Evening Bulletin was already wondering how long before the islands would become a vague memory. “It is curious,” the columnist wrote, “how soon our memories lose their hold on places.” The artist thought it was poignant that two islands could be removed and completely forgotten.

Levonian’s cutout animation single-channel video Lost Islands of Philadelphia tells the story of the islands, touching on themes of obsolescence and transience. It follows a girl who, after reading about the islands in a library book, but is unaware of their destruction, sets off on her own to find them. Her mother pursues her frantically on rollerblades, her lack of skating skills causing mayhem all the way.

Jennifer Levonian makes animations near Philadelphia. Her work has been exhibited across the United States, including at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, the Telfair Museum in Savannah, GA, the Contemporary Museum in Baltimore and the National Portrait Gallery, Washington, D.C. In 2009, she was awarded a Pew Fellowship in the Arts. She has attended residencies at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Bemis Center for Contemporary Art, and the Atlantic Center for the Arts. Her animation Xylophone won the Ken Burns Best of the Fest award at the 2017 Ann Arbor Film Festival.